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Huge progress for the Cameron YDNA Project has come this month of February after the Big Y700 test results, one last year and one this month.

Thanks to the work of tireless Cameron YDNA Project administrators Jo Cameron (NZ) and Lorraine Smith (Canada) amazing revelations regarding are deep ancestral roots are now available for all Camerons to peruse.

If you haven’t considered having your DNA tested, this latest update may inspire you to get on board. familytreedna.com is the place to go, as this is where our Cameron YDNA project resides. But don’t do anything until you read the update and contact either Jo or Lorraine for advice in the first instance. The exercise is not inexpensive, but it is valuable and highly rewarding. See: Family Tree DNA

It takes very little to unearth amazing genealogical connections. My cousin and I are the only two in our  cadet that had our YDNA tested, resulting in the revelation of our unique cadet branch Macmartin of Blarachaorin, branching off the main paternal line 1400 CE, with our 5 great grandfather being the most recent common ancestor around 1750 CE, Blarachaorin being the highland village where the Macmartin-Camerons resided.

The link to the update can be viewed on the Header of this website or from the link below:

Cameron YDNA Project Update

 

Few figures loom as large as the Earl of Huntly. His influence and power in the North of Scotland were such that he was often referred to as “the goodman of the North,” a title that underscored his near-sovereign authority in the region. The Earl of Huntly’s story is one of political cunning, territorial dominion, and a masterful balancing act in the shifting sands of Scottish feudal politics.

The influence of the Gordon’s on Clan Cameron is well documented, with many records relating to the Camerons of Lochaber held in the private records  of the Lordship of Lochaber in the Gordon papers in the National Records of Scotland, Edinburgh.

Lochiel was forced to acknowledge Lord Gordon’s rights of superiority of Cameron lands with the shifting allegiances of the times and the continued feud with the MacIntoshes.

National Clan Cameron Australia members can read the remaining article via the Members Only section or by following the link below.

The Earl of Huntly and the Gordon Clan

The Scottish Highlands are known for their rugged landscapes, rich history, and complex clan relationships. One of the most enduring and fierce feuds in Highland history was the centuries-old conflict between the Clan Cameron and the Chattan Confederation, led by Clan Mackintosh. This feud, which lasted for an astonishing 328 years, was marked by bloodshed, violence, and longstanding enmity. However, in 1665, an extraordinary event took place – the Stand-off at the Fords of Arkaig. This standoff, surprisingly, ended the feud without a drop of blood being shed.

National Clan Cameron Australia members can read the remaining article via the Members Only section or by following the link below.

The Feud Between Clan Cameron and Clan Chattan finally ends

The Scottish Highlands are known for their rugged landscapes, rich history, and complex clan relationships. One of the most enduring and fierce feuds in Highland history was the centuries-old conflict between the Clan Cameron and the Chattan Confederation, led by Clan Mackintosh. This feud, which lasted for an astonishing 328 years, was marked by bloodshed, violence, and longstanding enmity. However, in 1665, an extraordinary event took place – the Stand-off at the Fords of Arkaig. This standoff, surprisingly, ended the feud without a drop of blood being shed. In this blog post, we will delve into the historical context, the events that led to this remarkable resolution, and the enduring legacy of the Fords of Arkaig.

The Highland Feud: Clan Cameron vs. Chattan Confederation

The origins of the feud between Clan Cameron and the Chattan Confederation can be traced back to the 14th century. The feud began during the time of Allan MacDonald Dubh Cameron, the 12th Chief of Clan Cameron. The Chattan Confederation, a loose alliance of various clans, was led by the Clan Mackintosh. The dispute revolved around contested lands and property rights.

The first recorded battle in this feud was the Battle of Drumlui in 1337, where disputes over land at Glenlui and Loch Arkaig led to violence between the two sides. This battle marked the beginning of a series of conflicts that would span generations.

Over the centuries, the feud escalated with numerous clashes, including the Battle of Invernahoven in 1370 and the Battle of the North Inch in 1396, where warriors from both sides fought in trial by combat. The conflict continued through the 15th century, with battles such as the Battle of Harlaw in 1411 and the Battle of Palm Sunday in 1429.

The 328-Year Feud: Prolonged Animosity

One of the significant battles in this enduring feud was the Battle of Inverlochy in 1431. Clan Cameron fought against the Clan Donald, whose chief Alexander of Islay, Earl of Ross, had been imprisoned by the king. The MacDonalds were led by Alexander’s nephew, Donald Balloch MacDonald, who defeated the royalist army led by the Earl of Mar.

In 1441, another battle took place between the Mackintoshes and Clan Cameron, known as the Battle of Craig Cailloc. The conflict over territory and resources persisted, further fueling the feud.

The 16th century saw Clan Cameron’s participation in various battles, including the Battle of Achnashellach in 1505 during Dubh’s Rebellion and the Battle of Flodden in 1513 during the Anglo-Scottish Wars. Despite their involvement in these conflicts, the feud with Clan Mackintosh endured.

The Battle of Bun Garbhain, fought in 1570, was a significant event in Clan Cameron’s history. It occurred after the death of Donald Dubh Cameron, the 15th Chief of Clan Cameron. During the battle, the Chief of MacKintosh is believed to have been killed by Donald ‘Taillear Dubh na Tuaighe’ Cameron, who wielded a fearsome Lochaber axe. The feud continued despite this clash.

The Clan Cameron’s involvement in the Raid on Ross in 1491 showcased their ongoing hostility towards Clan Mackintosh. The 17th century saw Clan Cameron’s engagement in the Civil War, the Battle of Inverlochy in 1645, and Glencairn’s rising of 1651 to 1654. The feud with Clan Mackintosh remained a constant throughout these years.

The Stand-off at the Fords of Arkaig (1665)

As the feud between Clan Cameron and the Chattan Confederation continued into the mid-17th century, an unexpected event unfolded in 1665. The Stand-off at the Fords of Arkaig, also known as the Arkaig Stand-off, marked a turning point in the history of these warring clans.

The Stand-off at the Fords of Arkaig was a unique event in Highland history. Instead of escalating into bloodshed, the encounter between the Camerons and the Chattan Confederation became a stand-off without violence. The reasons for this unexpected outcome and the individuals involved remain central to the story.

The most notable figure in the Stand-off at the Fords of Arkaig was Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel, the 17th Chief of Clan Cameron. He played a crucial role in keeping the peace between his clan and Clan Mackintosh, as he recognized the need to end the protracted feud. However, when he was away in London, a feud broke out between Clan MacDonald and the Mackintoshes, resulting in the Battle of Mulroy in which Clan Cameron contributed to the MacDonald victory.

The Resolution of a Centuries-Old Feud

The Stand-off at the Fords of Arkaig marked the moment when Clan Cameron and the Chattan Confederation decided to lay down their arms and put an end to their feud. Though the precise circumstances and negotiations leading to this resolution are not widely documented, it is evident that both sides recognized the need to move forward and put an end to the animosity.

The Stand-off at the Fords of Arkaig was a remarkable event in Highland history, signifying the end of a feud that had persisted for 328 years. This resolution had significant implications, as it paved the way for a more peaceful coexistence among clans in the Highlands. While the feud may have ended, the memories of past conflicts and the enduring camaraderie among clans continued to shape the region’s history and culture.

Conclusion

The Stand-off at the Fords of Arkaig in 1665 is a remarkable chapter in Scottish history. This unique event, without a drop of blood being shed, brought an end to a feud that had spanned centuries. It marked the moment when the Camerons and the Chattan Confederation chose to let go of their animosity and move forward, ushering in a new era in the Scottish Highlands.

Ref: scottishtales.subtack.com

This great summary of what has happened to the Highlands and Islands after Culloden was written by Chris Grant, who has just written a book about Culloden and its aftermath, with particular reference to the Grants of Glenurquhart and Glenmoriston, and their Clansmen and women.

“The harsh treatment of the Highlanders and their families after Culloden merely served as a starting pistol to what we would call today cultural genocide. What followed in the pacification of the Highlands was successive Acts of Parliament, which would in effect implement policies which sought to gradually, but systematically, dismantle all the cornerstones of Highland Gaelic culture.

 These acts would in time not only change the clothing, culture and way of life in the Highlands, but by the ending of Heritable Jurisdiction, fundamentally change the very structure of their society, and this in turn greatly contributed to the later Highland Clearances, which were also encouraged. The majority of ordinary people saw that they had no economic future in light of how they were being expected to live.

 The policies which were rolled out over a protracted period even sought the very eradication of the language of the people. These policies contributed greatly to emptying the Glens of people throughout the Highlands and Islands, and set the scene for what we see today, where once thriving communities on many a Highland hillside and in the lower glens, now hold nothing but the vegetation-covered skeletons of the former homes of those people.

Areas which once thrived with population are now eerily empty and largely devoid of life and people, in what were acts of vindictive cultural vandalism that the Highlands has never recovered from and which it is so much the poorer for in our modern age, where little but tourism and wealthy landowners coexist over huge swathes of a picturesque but sadly empty land.

They created a desert largely devoid of people and life and called it peace, which is quite an apt way of portraying the Highlands of Scotland in our modern era.”

Thanks to: Dot MacKenzie GSDC. Group To Stop Development At Culloden.

Maeshowe was probably built around 2800 BC. In the archaeology of Scotland, it gives its name to the Maeshowe type of chambered cairn, which is limited to Orkney.

Maeshowe is one of the largest tombs in Orkney. The mound encasing the tomb is 35 m in diameter and rises to a height of 7.3 m. Surrounding the mound, at a distance of 15 m to 21 m is a ditch up to 14 m wide. The grass mound hides a complex of passages and chambers built of carefully crafted slabs offlagstone weighing up to 30 tons. It is aligned so that the rear wall of its central chamber is illuminated on the winter solstice.

Maeshowe is a significant example of Neolithic craftsmanship and is, in the words of the archaeologists, “a superlative monument that by its originality of execution is lifted out of its class into a unique position.”

The Historic Environment Scotland digital documentation team has created a 3D interactive model.

Maeshowe entrance

Maeshowe

Cross-sections of maeshowe

The interactive 3D model can be seen via the link below.

Masehowe – 3D interactive model